It does have thorns and it is easy to work. I thought the same. Russian Olive ( Elaeagnus angustfolia ) QUICK IDENTIFICATION. EC167. Related Species: None available. It has a gray-green hue when seen from a distance. Also, it tends to split easily while drying. Russian Olive Species Elaeagnus angustifolia. Related Species: None available. Information Sheet (PDF) Colorado List B - Eradication required in parts of Jefferson County. Leaves: Simple and alternate. Similar species: Russian olive; invasive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) is a tree that can reach 30' with twigs that have a terminal spine. The Russian olive is a deciduous ornamental tree that originated in eastern Europe and western Asia, and was introduced to the United States in the early 1900s. Russian Olive is not closely related to the wood that is commonly referred to as Olivewood (Olea europaea) and may be distinguished from true Olive by the endgrain. Native To: Eurasia (Zouhar 2005) Date of U.S. Introduction: Exact date unknown; was introduced to the central and western U.S. by the early 1900s (Zouhar 2005) Means of Introduction: Introduced as a horticultural plant (Zouhar 2005) Impact: The best windbreak plant for high wind areas.Pictured are the Russian olive berries.. Russian olive is a perennial deciduous tree native to Europe and Asia. Russian olive has elliptic to lanceolate leaves, its branches are usually thorny, and its fruit is yellow, dry and mealy. Identifying and Using Hundreds of Woods Worldwide, POSTER: Worldwide Woods: Ranked by Hardness. The tree has alternate, lanceolate leaves with a silver color on the top and underside. Document: 2014_05_12_RO_vs_Buff.pdf. ORIgIN. The underside of the dark green leaf is silver in color. The plant has elliptical to lanceolate shaped leaves and thorny branches. This is russian olive. Buffaloberry Buffaloberry (Shepherdia canadensis) is also related to autumn olive but is native to Michigan. Best offers for your Garden - https://amzn.to/2InnD0w ----- Facts on the Russian Olive Tree. Fruits of Russian olive are yellow, dry and olive … Russian olive, oleaster. As such, it has spread aggressively and is regarded as an invasive species throughout much of the western U.S. Summary of Invasiveness Top of page. It was commonly planted for wildlife food and cover. Sapwood a much lighter yellow-white. my experiences with Russian olive is that it is rather easy to work with and finishes very nicely. Russian-olive was common along both rivers in stands with plants of many ages, suggesting that Russian-olive, but not cottonwood, recruitment continues to occur under established Russian-olive trees. Russian-olive is native to eastern Europe and western Asia. Are Rosewoods (and Bubinga) really banned by CITES? Aerial map showing the distribution of Russian olive along the corridor of the North Platte River near Mitchell, Nebraska on June 21, 2005. This determination, however, means that it quickly spreads and becomes a nuisance that is very hard to remove. Leaves are … Five to 10 tubular, silver … It was introduced to North America in the early 1900s as a landscaping tree because it was thought to be useful as a windbreak, soil stabilizer, and habitat provider. This shrub is native to Asia and was introduced into the U.S. in the 1830's. It has a gray-green hue when seen from a distance. Elaeagnus angustifolia, commonly called Russian olive, silver berry, oleaster, or wild olive, is a species of Elaeagnus, native to western and central Asia, Iran, from southern Russia and Kazakhstan to Turkey, and parts of Pakistan. Best offers for your Garden - https://amzn.to/2InnD0w ----- Facts on the Russian Olive Tree. Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) is a relatively small ornamental tree which has recently impacted several regions in BC.First introduced for its silver leaves and ability to withstand cold BC winters, this tree is … EC167. The first known planting of Russian-olive in Nevada occurred in 1906. Its scientific name is Elaeagnus angustifolia and it is also known, more commonly, as the oleaster tree. Apparently brought to North America in the late 1800s; it was planted as an ornamental, and subsequently escaped into the wild. Large saplings can be treated in a similar fashion, taking care to treat the entire cut surface. When using herbicides remember to follow label-recommendations. Many of the local ranchers have pulled the root bases from the banks of irrigation ditches and streams and there is an abundance of dried root balls to chose my wood from! General. Russian-olive is native to southern Europe and western Asia, but has been planted extensively throughout the U.S. as a windbreak, ornamental shrub, soil stabilizer, and wildlife attractant. Jan Samanek, State Phytosanitary Administration, Bugwood.org. Russian-olive is native to eastern Europe and western Asia. Russian Olive. The abundance of fruit, which is readily dispersed by birds, is key to the success of this species. Distribution: Native to eastern Europe and western and central Asia; naturalized throughout North America, Tree Size: 20-35 ft (6-10 m) tall, 1-1.5 ft (.3-.5 m) trunk diameter, Average Dried Weight: 43 lbs/ft3 (685 kg/m3), Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .55, .69, *Estimated hardness based upon specific gravity. It is commonly used as a windbreak and wildlife cover and food. Flowers: Tube- or bell-shaped, fragrant and borne in leaf axils. E. angustifolia, the Russian olive, is one of several species of Elaeagnus that has proven invasive. Wood is limited to small-scale and hobbyist uses. This shrub’s silvery foliage, showy flowers, and colorful berries made it popular in landscaping, though it was also planted extensively for a period of time in natural areas to provide erosion control, wind breaks, and wildlife food. Identification should be confirmed by a specialist. Birds are the primary fruit disperser. Identification. Olive is diffuse porous, while Russian Olive is ring-porous. Allergies/Toxicity: Besides the standard health risks associated with any type of wood dust, no further health reactions have been associated with Russian Olive. During August to October, the olive-shaped drupes containing one nut mature. My fathers property in southern Illinois is over whelmed with Russian Olive trees as they were used in near by coal mining areas during reclamation of the mines after they closed. See the articles Wood Allergies and Toxicity and Wood Dust Safety for more information. Here is a link for more 411. Although birds eat its fruits, bird diversity actually decreases in areas dominated by Russian olive instead of by the former blend of native species. It is commonly used as a windbreak and wildlife cover and food. Russian Olive Shrubs, or Elaeagnus angustifolia, is an excellent windbreak shrub and wildlife plant.Russian Olive Bushes are extremely tolerant of environmental factors. It has longer, narrower leaves that are silvery on top as well as on the underside. Identification: Russian Olive is a deciduous thorny tree that may reach 35 feet in height. Russian-olive’s ability to Russian Olive Elaeagnus angustifolia L.. International Code - ELAN FIA survey code - 0997 Miller, James H. 2003. Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia), which is also an invasive species. It is taller and is usually a single or multi-stemmed tree. This publication is available online or printed copies are available free from local Extension offices. It peeled off like bark ( but clearly wasn’t) exposing 4 panels glued together. Also, the top had some water damage that was ‘ lifting’ the very thin layer on the top. Russian olive is not toxic to animals and the fruits are attractive to some wildlife. Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) is a relatively small ornamental tree which has recently impacted several regions in BC.First introduced for its silver leaves and ability to withstand cold BC winters, this tree is now … Watch out for the sharp thorns. Russian olive flowers are yellow inside and silver outside. YOu are actually doing an admirable thing cutting down and burning Russian Olive, it is a non-native and it is on the Invasive Species lists and it's sale/use is banned, or proposed to be banned, in many states. Russian olive can fix nitrogen in its roots and grow on infertile soils; it can come to dominate streamside vegetation. Both species are prolific fruit producers. Stain? Leaves are long and narrow, silvery colored and scurfy. Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Russian Olive. The plant has elliptical to lanceolate shaped leaves and thorny branches. Once it is dried and sealed, I love it. Endgrain: Ring-porous; 5-10 rows of medium to large earlywood pores, exclusively solitary latewood pores grading from medium to small; tyloses sometimes present; medium to wide rays visible without lens, spacing wide; parenchyma generally not visible with hand lens, or diffuse-in-aggregates (barely visible). Alternative Native Species: Yaupon (Ilex vomitoria), Carolina Laurel Cherry (Prunus caroliniana), Rusty Blackhaw (Viburnum rafinesquianum). Buffaloberry Buffaloberry (Shepherdia canadensis) is also related to autumn olive but is native to Michigan. Flowers: Tube- or bell-shaped, fragrant and borne in leaf axils. I live on the Wind River Indian Reservation, in Wyoming, where Russian Olive is considered an invasive and unwanted species. Watch out for the sharp thorns. Russian olive The related Russian olive (E. angustifolia) is also a non-native invasive species. … that is usually found in riparian areas, as well as fields and other open areas. Russian olive is a medium-sized deciduous tree that is drought-resistant. As of mid-2014, the tree was classified as a "noxious weed" in Colorado, New Mexico and Connecticut, where its growth is banned, according to the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. They grow rapidly and re-sprout quickly after cutting or burning. Aerial map showing the distribution of Russian olive along the corridor of the North Platte River near Mitchell, Nebraska on June 21, 2005. The bark is dark brown and stems are red, smooth, and thorny. Blooms in late spring. Elaeagnus angustifolia L.. Russian olive Beautiful wood, but until it is thoroughly dried, while working with it, it smells awful – my brother was making 10 inch boxes out of it and said “smells like cat piss”. Color/Appearance: Color ranges from a light yellowish-brown to a darker golden brown, sometimes with a greenish hue. Like its sibling Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia), the autumn olive is hardy and survives where many other plants fail. FYI: I receive a commission on sales generated through links to Amazon, eBay, etc. Bow Woods (from a mathematical perspective), Brazilian Rosewood, East Indian, and Other Rosewoods, Genuine Lignum Vitae and Argentine Lignum Vitae, BOOK: WOOD! Any mention of trade, products, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by North Carolina State University. Like most invasive plants, Russian olive replaces native plants in high quality natural areas, which in turn reduces critical food resources for birds, butterflies, and other wild creatures. Family: Oleaster (Elaeagnaceae) Has been used as an ornamental and windbreak but no longer available in Colorado; Native to Eurasia; Habitat. Easily grows into a fast growing hedge by planting 10' apart in rows. The Silverthorn is also closely related to the Autumn Olive and Russian Olive, both of which have edible fruit as well (E. umbellata, E. angustifolia. I am refinishing a 3 drawer, 4 cupboard piece of furniture that I believe is olive wood. It has an open crown and often thorny branches. Copyright © 2008-2020 Eric Meier | All Rights Reserved, Fluorescence: A Secret Weapon in Wood Identification. Although grown as a small ornamental tree, the Russian olive … Russian olive has elliptic to lanceolate leaves, its branches are usually thorny, and its fruit is yellow, dry and mealy. It is native to temperate Eurasia but has become especially invasive in riverine areas in the western USA, and is increasingly common in areas already invaded by exotic saltcedars (Tamarix spp. The small fruit is readily eaten and disseminated by many species of birds. Though they have some differences—notably Russian olive's green, mealy fruit, in contrast to the bright, mottled red fruit of autumn olive—the species are ecologically very similar and require the same control treatment. Russian-olive’s ability to The species arrived in the United States during colonial times and moved west with the early settlers. Russian olive oleaster This plant can be weedy or invasive according to the authoritative sources noted below.This plant may be known by one or more common names in … Leaves: Simple and alternate. Jan Samanek, State Phytosanitary Administration, Bugwood.org. Russian Olive is not closely related to the wood that is commonly referred to as Olivewood (Olea europaea) and may be distinguished from true Olive by the endgrain. The Silverthorn is also closely related to the Autumn Olive and Russian Olive, both of which have edible fruit as well (E. umbellata, E. angustifolia. Autumn Olive is a deciduous shrub that can grow quite tall. Russian Olive Species Elaeagnus angustifolia. Oil? By the early 1900’s, Russian-olive was present in most western states. that is usually found in riparian areas, as well as fields and other open areas. The plants are exceptionally vigorous and have been reported as invasive in some areas. Leaves are alternately arranged, are narrow and lance shaped with wavy, smooth edges, and are typically up to 3¼â€ long by ¾â€ wide. Plant Identification. Figure 3. YOu are actually doing an admirable thing cutting down and burning Russian Olive, it is a non-native and it is on the Invasive Species lists and it's sale/use is banned, or proposed to be banned, in many states. Russian olive leaves are alternate, simple, narrowly lanceolate and covered with silvery-gray hairs. Leaves are silver on both sides, longer and more lance-shaped. The tree occurs along forest edges and openings, eventually forming dense stands. This 1-page handout describes the differences between invasive Russian olive and native silverleaf buffaloberry. Grain/Texture: Unlike true Olive (Olea genus), Russian Olive is very porous and of an uneven grain texture. Conversely, cottonwood establishment and dominance is not precluded on sites where flooding and new channel development continuously create new cottonwood habitat [ 15 , 112 ]. This publication is available online or printed copies are available free from local Extension offices. It is taller and is usually a single or multi-stemmed tree. In many areas it is a nuisance weed, and it could become much worse. Apparently brought to North America in the late 1800s; it was planted as an ornamental, and subsequently escaped into the wild. Autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) is an ornamental shrub first introduced to North America in the mid-1800s. Leaves are silver on both sides, longer and more lance-shaped. Russian Olive Shrubs, or Elaeagnus angustifolia, is an excellent windbreak shrub and wildlife plant.Russian Olive Bushes are extremely tolerant of environmental factors. Russian Olive is not closely related to the wood that is commonly referred to as Olivewood (Olea europaea) and may be distinguished from true Olive by the endgrain. The Russian olive's capacity to overtake other plants is well-documented; it competes with them for nutrients, moisture and light. It can also change nutrient cycling and tax water reserves. Russian olive flowers are yellow inside and silver outside. Ecology: Russian Olive prefers sandy floodplains and is shade intolerant. Identification. It has longer, narrower leaves that are silvery on top as well as on the underside. It takes over streambanks, lakeshores and prairies, choking out native vegetation. The twigs are covered with small silver scales may bear sharp spines up to 2” in length. Both Russian and autumn olive were introduced into the United States in the 1800s. 03 of 20. Another potentially invasive plant with probably similar BTUs/burn value is it's cousin: Autumn Olive. Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia), which is also an invasive species. Monitor for seedlings and control as needed. Its native to Europe and western Asia. The tree has alternate, lanceolate leaves with a silver color on the top and underside. Birds are the primary fruit disperser. Oleaster, Russian Olive (Elaeagnus) This genus of small, bushy trees (commonly planted in rural districts of eastern Oregon) is not native to Oregon and is currently not fully described on this website. Here is a link for more 411. Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) was introduced to North America as an ornamental shrub and as a windbreak plant in the late 1800s. Highly aromatic, silvery-white to yellow flowers in clusters of 4-petals; Fruit is yellow to light gray and almost completely covered by dense silver scales; Height 10 to 30 feet, taking the form of a large shrub or small tree; Its native to Europe and western Asia. The Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) is a shrub or small tree, often leaning or twisted and distorted. I have often thought of making a semi hollow lamented body guitar out of this, but not sure about the tonal properties of the wood. There is tons of it, here and I will be harvesting a lot of it for mallet heads and for knife scales, too! Russian Olive Evergreen Shrubs. Russian-olive occurs in similar open habitats as autumn-olive, but is far less common. Anyone know the best way to seal it? The Silverthorn, Elaeagnus pungens, came from China and Japan to North America some 200 years ago in the early 1800’s.It’s an ornamental landscape plant often used for hedges and barriers. Russian olive is similar, with leaves silvery on upper and lower surfaces, but is not naturalized in Maine. Until recently, the U.S. Common Uses: Knife scales, bowls, pens, and other small woodturning projects. Related Articles: Fluorescence: A Secret Weapon in Wood Identification; Scans/Pictures: Biology, identification, distribution and control of Russian Olive, including illustrated growth cycle and photos to aid in plant and pest identification. The species arrived in the United States during colonial times and moved west with the early settlers. Additional details can be found in the parent project 6206-22000-006-00D, Biological Control of Saltcedar, Russian Olive, and Other Invasive Weeds of the Western USA. Resources A Field Guide for the Identification of Invasive Plants in Southern Forests - USDA Forest Service The first known planting of Russian-olive in Nevada occurred in 1906. The best windbreak plant for high wind areas.Pictured are the Russian olive berries.. Figures 2. However, because of the tree’s rapid growth and adaptability to poor soil, it’s now considered an invasive species in many areas of the United States. Identification: The Russian olive is a large, spiny, perennial deciduous shrub or small growing tree (up to 40ft.) In many areas it is a nuisance weed, and it could become much worse. Russian-olive is native to southern Europe and western Asia, but has been planted extensively throughout the U.S. as a windbreak, ornamental shrub, soil stabilizer, and wildlife attractant. Identification: Russian olive is a small tree that grows up to 40’ tall and 25’ wide. The leaves have a dintinctive silver underside. Figure 3. Russian olive bark is reddish brown and branches may possess sharp thorns. I have found that when dried, it is very hard and not easy to carve but, when green, it is very easy to carve! It takes over streambanks, lakeshores and prairies, choking out native vegetation. Olive is diffuse porous, while Russian Olive is ring-porous. The underside of the dark green leaf is silver in color. Biology, identification, distribution and control of Russian Olive, including illustrated growth cycle and photos to aid in plant and pest identification. Russian Olive Evergreen Shrubs. This invasive tree is spread by bird dispersed seeds. Due to its ability to adapt to a range of habitats, it is planted on highways for erosion control or for sheltering purposes. Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) is a nonnative invasive shrub that is nearly identical to autumn olive. The grain is outstanding. Russian olive can fix nitrogen in its roots and grow on infertile soils; it can come to dominate streamside vegetation. 03 of 20. The Silverthorn, Elaeagnus pungens, came from China and Japan to North America some 200 years ago in the early 1800’s.It’s an ornamental landscape plant often used for hedges and barriers. (This is a monthly update, and your email will be kept private.). Comments: Originally brought to the United States in the late 1800s for windbreaks and erosion control (and as an ornamental tree). The small fruit is readily eaten and disseminated by many species of birds. Habitat Autumn olive has nitrogen-fixing root nodules which allow it to thrive in poor soils. Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia), which grows in USDA zones 3 through 7, is a deciduous tree or large shrub, with silvery leaves and fruits that look like olives. Identification: The Russian olive is a large, spiny, perennial deciduous shrub or small growing tree (up to 40ft.) Blooms in late spring. Russian Olive ( Elaeagnus angustfolia ) QUICK IDENTIFICATION. Photos of distinctive characteristics are provided. Its scientific name is Elaeagnus angustifolia and it is also known, more commonly, as the oleaster tree. Russian olive oleaster This plant can be weedy or invasive according to the authoritative sources noted below.This plant may be known by one or more common names in … Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) was introduced to North America as an ornamental shrub and as a windbreak plant in the late 1800s. Elaeagnus angustifolia Description Popular name(s): Russian Olive, Persian Olive, Wild Olive, Silver Berry, Oleaster Botanical name: Elaeagnus angustifolia Family: Elaeagnaceae Origin: Eastern Europe to Asia (China, India, ... Plant identification is a project by Frau-Doktor. Like its sibling Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia), the autumn olive is hardy and survives where many other plants fail. Russian olive’s leaves are silver on both sides, longer and more lance-shaped and the flowers are yellow inside and silver outside. The autumn olive shrub is easy to identify when it is in flower or once the fruits have matured. INVASIVE CHARACTERISTICS: Autumn-olive and Russian-olive aggressively outcompete native plants and shrubs. Russian olive bark is reddish brown and branches may possess sharp thorns. Elaeagnus angustifolia L.. Russian olive INVASIVE CHARACTERISTICS: Autumn-olive and Russian-olive aggressively outcompete native plants and shrubs. Five to 10 tubular, silver or yellow fragrant flowers appear between April and June. Russian olive The related Russian olive (E. angustifolia) is also a non-native invasive species. Most of the smaller ones, 6 inch and under trunk size, have a beautiful purple and white heart wood, especially in the smaller branches. The Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) is a shrub or small tree, often leaning or twisted and distorted. Related Articles: Fluorescence: A Secret Weapon in Wood Identification; Scans/Pictures: Finished with a combination mixture of clear lacquer, boiled linseed oil, and denatured alcohol. Pricing/Availability: Russian Olive tends to be a very small tree, with a highly branching form that is not conducive to large or straight logs. Figure 4. The Russian olive is a deciduous ornamental tree that originated in eastern Europe and western Asia, and was introduced to the United States in the early 1900s. Until recently, the U.S. From the East Coast as far west as Nebraska, autumn olive is an aggressive in… Easily grows into a fast growing hedge by planting 10' apart in rows. The bark is dark brown and stems are red, smooth, and thorny. Soil Conservation Service recommended Russian-olive for wildlife planting and windbreaks. As of 2020 , it is widely established in North America as an introduced species. ), displacing native vegetation. Plant Control: In the home landscape, cut down large individual trees with a chainsaw and treat outer two inches of cut surface of stump with undiluted glyphosate concentrate (53.8% is preferable). This determination, however, means that it quickly spreads and becomes a nuisance that is very hard to remove. I would also like to know more about if you… Read more ». Although birds eat its fruits, bird diversity actually decreases in areas dominated by Russian olive instead of by the former blend of native species. Autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbettata) and Russian olive (E angustifolia).Identification: These shrubs or small trees (may grow up to 20 feet) are nitrogen-fixing.Leaves are alternate, oval, 1-3 inches in length, and untoothed. 2 look like the olive wood and 2 are green. Although it does provide a healthy supply of late season berries, Russain olive does not sustain insect populations during the growing season that songbirds require for their nestlings to survive to adulthood. They grow rapidly and re-sprout quickly after cutting or burning. Identification should be confirmed by a specialist. Autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata), its invasive relative, has a similar biology and is already widely invasive in New England. Another potentially invasive plant with probably similar BTUs/burn value is it's cousin: Autumn Olive. Highly aromatic, silvery-white to yellow flowers in clusters of 4-petals; Fruit is yellow to light gray and almost completely covered by dense silver scales; Height 10 to 30 feet, taking the form of a large shrub or small tree; Russian Olive was introduced into the New World for its use as a horticultural plant desired for its silver leaves and colorful berries; it may also have some value as a honey plant. Both species are prolific fruit producers. Olive is diffuse porous, while Russian Olive is ring-porous. I built a wood topped banjo with it and have loved the wood ever sense but it is a thorn bush and you will loose a lot of blood getting the wood and i lost a pickup tire to the 2inch thorns. It can also change nutrient cycling and tax water reserves. Figure 4. Russian Olive/Autumn Olive fixes nitrogen in the soil, thus changing the soil chemistry and altering native plant communities Shrubs grow so densely that native plants are crowded out Seedlings can be pulled by hand but the shrub readily resprouts if cut. Russian-olive was common along both rivers in stands with plants of many ages, suggesting that Russian-olive, but not cottonwood, recruitment continues to occur under established Russian-olive trees. Russian Olive/Autumn Olive fixes nitrogen in the soil, thus changing the soil chemistry and altering native plant communities Shrubs grow so densely that native plants are crowded out Seedlings can be pulled by hand but the shrub readily resprouts if cut. Ecologists have found that bird species richness is higher in riparian areas dominated by native vegetation. Identification: Russian Olive is a deciduous thorny tree that may reach 35 feet in height. Elaeagnus angustifolia. This wood is best suited to turned objects, in my experience, as the irregular wood and knots tend to make it hard to work with anything duller than a razor blade.Since I find that irregular woods seem to do well on the lathe, I use it for turnings, as it is very figured and I think it looks quite nice. Although Russian and autumn olive provide a plentiful source of berries for birds, their fruits are actually quite low in nutrients. By the early 1900’s, Russian-olive was present in most western states. Russian Olive. It has an open crown and often thorny branches. Fact Sheets and Identification Links. Autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbettata) and Russian olive (E angustifolia).Identification: These shrubs or small trees (may grow up to 20 feet) are nitrogen-fixing.Leaves are alternate, oval, 1-3 inches in length, and untoothed. Russian olive leaves are alternate, simple, narrowly lanceolate and covered with silvery-gray hairs. For a very common tree, this is generally not thought of as a good source of food for humans, yet a large number of compounds have been derived from Russian olive making this tree a good source of … Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. The literature on Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolium) was assembled and indexed in preparation to … Being a fairly common and fast-growing tree, prices should be moderate. Nonnative invasive plants of southern forests: a field guide for identification … Soil Conservation Service recommended Russian-olive for wildlife planting and windbreaks. The wood is not easy to turn but looks great if you stick with it. Figures 2. I want to leave it as natural as possible. Russian-olive occurs in similar open habitats as autumn-olive, but is far less common. As such, it has spread aggressively and is regarded as an invasive species throughout much of the western U.S.
2020 russian olive identification